Things We Can Retire: “Developmental age”

First and foremost, let’s remember that words matter. It’s not semantics. Words set the foundation for how people view our children. They create a framework of expectations and support services. They need to be carefully chosen, words selected to affirm and uplift individual’s humanity and right to respect. It’s why we don’t use the r-word and why the autistic community chooses identity-first language. Words matter.

One of the phrases that has been popping up in my life a lot recently has been “developmental age” — as in “my child is developmentally X months / years old”. It’s usually an age significantly below their chronological one. Other versions are “caring for my child is like caring for an infant” or “my child is really a toddler”.

Oh, parents and teachers, can we please agree to stop this? It’s not helpful, at best, and limiting at its worst. And inaccurate — so, so inaccurate.

It’s not helpful. After all, what does “developmentally two” even tell us? I see this pop up in lots of groups when asking for advice — “My student is developmentally two, what do I do about (AAC / work activity / behavior)?” Except that hasn’t really told us anything… What does the student like? Dislike? What assistive technology are they already accessing? What are their visual and sensory support needs? What comes easily for them? What is more challenging? Our evaluations, our present levels of performance, our conversations about our kids all need to get a lot more specific (at least in private… I understand keeping things pretty generic in public forums).

It’s inaccurate AND limiting. Here’s the bottom line: we don’t know what these students know. The students who have these phrases thrown around about them are the students who are the most challenging to accurately assess. They may have complex communication needs, significant apraxia, difficulties with sensory regulation, all of the above, or something else entirely. At best, our assessments may tell us the minimum that they know. For example, if a student shows that they can identify 5 letters, we now know they can identify at least 5 letters. We don’t know that they don’t have the knowledge of the other 21 letters. There are dozens of reasons why they may not have been able to demonstrate their knowledge. This is especially important for professionals, who need to be clear about the limitations of these assessments instead of presenting them as the end-all, be-all. When we use these tools to set up boxes like “developmentally two”, then we create preconceptions and limit access. We limit access to real literacy instruction, because “two year olds can’t learn to read yet”! They’re “not ready”! We limit access to general education classes and peers. We have medical professionals that won’t hear a child’s complaints about pain, because it’s written off due to their “developmental age”. We limit their exploration of new activities and adventures, whether it’s a 10th grade science experiment or going to a Nicki Minaj concert. We cannot keep doing this to our students. They deserve access to the entire world, to all the things that every other child and adult access.

It’s not respectful. Oh, friends, think about this deeply… Would you want someone to refer to you as an infant, toddler, child, a pre-teen, long after you left those years? I personally love to watch Hannah Montana and Lizzie McGuire. I saw Moana and Frozen in theaters multiple times. There have been plenty of times that I needed help with a zipper or a fastener or a total meltdown. I need reminders that it’s time to take a shower. One of my favorite ways to calm my body is to swing on the playground. It is an almost irresistible temptation to be next to the swings every day on the playground, actually. But, because I can speak, because I can demonstrate academic knowledge in a way the world has deemed acceptable, no one would think to call me a child. Our kids deserve the same respect. They can like what they like. They can need what they need. That doesn’t change the need for respect; our language needs to reflect that respect. Our kids’ age is simply their age. A teen is a teen is a teen.

We’ve lived this in our family. We’ve lived our 3rd grade daughter being taught Pete The Cat for the fifth or sixth year in a row, because her school team limited her. Or when she changed schools and they decided that clipping clothespins onto a box was even better, because she was a “pre-learner” (another version of developmental age, except somehow even worse). We’ve lived people thinking she shouldn’t say she hates school or us, because OMG, she’s such a precious sweet angel, a toddler in a taller body. We’ve also lived her pain and frustration  (and boredom!) over it. Indeed –it’s amazing how much more engaged and chatty — how much happier — she became with professionals that saw her, just her, no limits, no ages, no prerequisites required. Her current teacher talks about ecosystems and the solar system and the American revolution. Her occupational therapist celebrates her interests while challenging her and targeting written expression and continually raising the bar. Her vision therapist tried hard to convince her school team to work on literacy and number skills. These are the people who get to see all of her, who fall in love with her, who get her. I want more of those people.

So, yes, let’s retire this phrase. Let’s do better by the children and adults that we so deeply love and care for. Teachers and other professionals need to especially listen up, because we set the tone for speaking about disability at every eligibility or well-child check-up. We are why parents use these words. They hear them over and over over, from doctors and psychologists and school evaluation teams. They are cemented. We are the ones who are creating these artificial limits, making parents think that literacy and number sense and autonomous communication are pipe dreams. Except they are only pipe dreams when we don’t provide the services (due to the false limits we’ve set). See the feedback loop we’ve created?

We can break the loop. We can lead the change. It starts with our language, and continues with our practice. Let’s not limit kids with our words, and let’s not limit them with their access. We can do better. Let’s do it.

 

7 thoughts on “Things We Can Retire: “Developmental age”

  1. kathy p July 19, 2019 / 12:17 pm

    Thank you for writing about this! I’m going to read it at every IEP meeting!

    Like

    • ms. a August 4, 2019 / 1:00 am

      Thank you so much! I am so glad you found it helpful and hope it helps your teams!

      Like

  2. Janice Deur July 23, 2019 / 6:03 pm

    Could not possibly love this more!

    Like

    • ms. a August 4, 2019 / 1:00 am

      Thank you!

      Like

  3. Adelaide Dupont July 31, 2019 / 8:37 am

    Hello Unicorn,

    I remember being someone challenging to assess.

    I remember, too, the first time an assessment got me right.

    There was roughly six years difference and twenty assessments in between.

    “Let’s not limit kids with our words and let’s not limit them with their access”.

    And of course pre- means never as a certain Marc Gold said [or someone with the Try Another Way lot – Minnesotan advocate?]. Lou Brown.

    Educators have better ways to say and do these things – like “zone of proximal development” or “cusp”.

    There was a great paper on learning disability and disclosure from teachers to students where lots of special education jargon was used even though the students have difficulty with abstractions [at least as neurotypicals conceptualise them].

    “Her current teacher talks about ecosystems and the solar system and the American revolution. Her occupational therapist celebrates her interests while challenging her and targeting written expression and continually raising the bar. Her vision therapist tried hard to convince her school team to work on literacy and number skills. These are the people who get to see all of her, who fall in love with her, who get her. I want more of those people.” – wow.

    Some good books about the Solar System include Science Power 2 in the World Book – I am reading about the gas planets and Voyager.

    Now that occupational therapist is a keeper – I was just on Rehabilitation Index of 1985.

    Like

    • ms. a August 4, 2019 / 1:01 am

      Thank you for sharing your story with me. We are TRULY lucky with that occupational therapist — it’s the only therapy that we’ve kept going over time, because it’s about so much more than OT. I’ll check out that book!!!

      Like

      • Adelaide Dupont August 5, 2019 / 10:21 pm

        Ms A.

        Likewise. Glad you appreciate it.

        So so true.

        I read about more good occupational therapists the Russell kids had had and still do have. Especially in the field of emotional regulation, they did a lot of constructive work.

        Their Mum writes a very famous blog [Positive Special Needs Parenting which gives a lot of material in the Australian context]. And one of the Russells has been on TV and radio.

        Yes – check out Science Power 1 and Science Power 2.

        Also there are some very journalistic books like the Book of Where and the Book of Why.

        And Readers Digest has HOW IS IT DONE?

        Like

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