Review: Hello, Universe

dark cover with a picture of a boy in pit/hole while 3 friends and a dog walk on the earth above.Genre: middle grades contemporary

Release date: March 14, 2017

Synopsis: Hello, Universe is told from the perspectives of four weens: Virgil, Chet, Kaori, and Valencia. Virgil is incredibly shy, possibly socially anxious, and lonely. Between school and home, he feels completely out of place. He’s also subject to intense bullying by Chet, which includes repeated use of the r-word. One day, Virgil goes missing. His friend Kaori (a self-proclaimed psychic) and her new client Valencia go on an adventure to find and rescue their friend.

Disabilities represented: learning disabilities, anxiety, deafness

Warning: The bullying in this book can get very emotionally intense and may be difficult to read, especially if you’ve been the recipient of bullying or feeling outcast due to your disabilities. I had to take repeated breaks during the novel.

Review: This book is an emotional roller coaster, with a lot to digest — but it’s also the kind of book that stays with you long after finishing. Kelly captures the intense feelings of what it means to be alone, of what it feels like to be bullied, of what it feels like to be perennially on the outside, looking in. But she also captures the warmth of her characters (Kaori, especially) and the hope that can come in building even one, true friendship.

One piece that Kelly captures incredibly well is the struggle of having a disability in a family and culture that pushes for “normal”. Valencia is hearing impaired, but has never been taught sign language. She is expected to read lips, which is hard enough — and even harder in a world where people do not accommodate. Little things, like facing the person you’re speaking to, can make the difference, yet so many people do not think to do them (or, worse, actively don’t care). Accommodations are important, both official ones and informal ones that we can do for each other. But it also opens up a discussion about American Sign Language — and why the dominant culture and hearing parents still see ASL as “less than”, as something to be avoided and ignored if any hearing can be captured at all. ASL is language. A valid, important, beautiful language. And more — ASL doesn’t just provide a way to communicate, but it also can be an integral part of connecting to Deaf culture. All of which raises questions about identity-first language, pride, neurodiversity and acceptance — important conversations to be having with our children.

I do recommend reading it with children or students, but I recommend doing so as a read-aloud or buddy read. There’s a lot to unpack, and I think most students would benefit from unpacking it with someone. For example, the use of the r-word in this novel should be unpacked together to discuss why that word is so offensive and painful to disabled communities (on top of the bullying way that it is used). It would also provide a great text for talking about what it means to be a friend and to welcome all into our communities, whether our classrooms or our neighborhoods. Overall, this book really captured my heart — wrung it out — and lingered with me for days… Five stars, and I understand why it won awards.