How We Do It: All Talkers, All the Time

tween girl in stroller with AAC device on lap as she talks to Donald Duck
tween talking to Donald Duck with AAC system in her lap

Whenever we start a student on an AAC system, I tell people that our first step is ensuring that the device is always available. I tell parents — spend the first 2-3 weeks just bringing the talker with you. Bring it to the bathroom. Bring it to the playground. The grocery store. The bus. Seriously: before modeling, before anything else… We have to develop routines to ensure the system is available.

The obvious reason: we cannot model if the device is not there. Our students cannot use their systems if they are not there.

But also: it shows our students that we think their systems are important. We think their voice is important. We are telling our students with our actions that we want to hear what they are saying. We want to hear it everywhere, all the time, always. This world so often silences our students. We are saying — no, not us, not now, not anymore. This is powerful.

Here are some tips & tricks that we’ve used to ensure devices are available.

Set the foundation. Know your “why” for using AAC. Know it deeply. Share it with your team. Look for the moments that reinforce that why. This commitment to voice comes first. Take every opportunity to model this commitment and be a leader in the classroom.

Students can carry their systems. This isn’t always appropriate due to age, strength, etc… Adults can certainly carry systems for children. But don’t be afraid to let children carry their system. Ask them if they want to carry their system. Of note: do not make students carry their systems. The last thing we ever want to do is turn their voices into “work” that we insist they do. Show them the power by respecting their voice and choices, even if the choice is to let someone else carry it.

Use visual supports. When we first had 8 talkers in one room, it was a challenge to get them all out on the playground. We had visual supports on the door to remind us: did we get ALL of the talkers? “See me, see my AAC”, a tagline created by Kate Ahern, has frequently been posted on our bulletin boards, data sheets, and around the classroom.

iPad in pink case next to stack of Legos

Assign responsibilities. We have one person who always checks bags in the morning to make sure all talkers are available. We have another person who always checks to make sure we have all the talkers before we go to the playground. If someone sees a talker without a child, they grab it and bring it or the student or team working. We support each other. These routines have helped embed the availability of talkers into our classroom culture.

Consider the whole system. First, make sure there is always a back-up. Technology fails. Even low-tech. There are many ways to have a back-up system, each with its own strengths. Have a second iPad, a printed version, a core word board on your keychain. Remember also that an AAC system is often multimodal, more than one specific device. My daughter uses modified signs, partner-assisted scanning, word approximations, and her iPad device. Different environments require different pieces of her system; we plan accordingly.

Straps, harnesses, and more. Every device in our classroom has an attached strap. The use of straps, carrying bags (Chat Bag), or harnesses (Jabber Jas, Safe N Sound) is an individual decision. It also can change over time. Those are the most common ways to carry systems but we’ve also used a classroom cart. Be creative! I find that having some sort of carrying mechanism makes it easier to transition a device — especially if there are multiple systems in a classroom.

young girl in a stroller holding her AAC system in her lap while she participates in miniature golf

Eliminate fear. Fear of breaking tends to be one of the reasons that systems get left at home or on tables. We match students carefully to the best case and carrying system for their needs. We’ve matched students to water-resistant cases when they liked to pour fluids. We’ve matched students to cases with attached oral-motor chews when the case was bite-tempting. We’ve doubled up screen protectors. We’ve placed systems inside Ziploc bags. We’ve printed on iGage or TerraSlate paper. We also always make sure to have a warranty or AppleCare Plus.

Have you tried any of these strategies? Are there other strategies that you would recommend?