Virtual Learning Tool: See-Saw

image of three screenshots from "Wheels on the Bus" songs
picture choice board posted on See-Saw of photos

I use See-Saw for both in person teaching and virtual learning. Here are some of the ideas and ways that I’ve used See-Saw.It worked well last year. We will see how it goes this year 🙂 Hopefully there’s some inspiration here.

Daily Announcements / News

Each morning, I post the link to our meetings, our learning goals, and a “to do list” of available activities. It helps when things could otherwise feel overwhelming or get buried. I post this by “post student work – note”, but you could also do it through a photo or video. 

Student Work (Photo / Video)

During the school year, I share photos and videos of students from their time at school. It’s such a nice way for families to see their students’ learning in action in a way that IEP goals just cannot always capture. It also helps us all be on the same page. I do this by “post student work – upload”. Parents oftenl send me photos in the message center, but they can also post them to student journals in the See-Saw Class app. 

Parent Support (Photo / Video)

I also share 2-5 minute videos about different strategies that we are using at school. Families can send photo or video of something they are trying or want assistance with. It’s a great tool for asynchronous sharing of multimedia. 

Parent Communication

The message center is amazing. I set it up for push notifications, so I know when someone has messaged me. We can message back and forth, similar to text messaging. But you can also send photos, videos, links, etc, just like real text messages. It keeps the whole history of conversation so you can scroll back as needed. 

image of colorful blocks with text describing actions to do (let's make 1... model making 1... pause and let your child make the number)
See-Saw activity for counting and creating sets of different blocks & items

Student Activities: Hands-On

See-Saw is also a tool for asynchronous virtual learning. You can create assignments that allow for students to submit photos, video, notes, etc… This frees you to move away from the screen, which is a concern with many families and teachers. How do we engage around play? Communication? I have an assignment to practice rolling balls with Play-Doh. Students can then send me pictures! We’ve done sink or float experiments, stacking blocks, practicing requesting water (drink or play), and so much more. I love to also post a video fo myself modeling the activity. Rather than needing Flipgrid, it can be completed right there in the same app. 

Student Activities with Screens

You can also create activities that you complete inside See-Saw, similar to Google Slides, drawing, etc… Again, it’s a great way to do a variety of activities without having to change apps. You can create or search activities for drawing / coloring, drag & drop, video, photo, etc… We’ve sorted types of animals, traced letters from our name, added photos from our homes for big / little, and counted out loud while the microphone recorded. Providing FeedbackYou can give feedback to students and families through commenting on any post — or even sending a video to students talking about what worked well!
Some useful things to know:

  • Folders will help you organize your life. Teachers and parents can pull up just one folder, so it’s easy to scroll back through newsletters, links, etc… The two most common ways I’ve organized are either by type of resource or by subject area. 
  • When you tag multiple students in one post, then every tagged student and parent will be able to see each other’s comments. This can be great when you want to encourage connection, but something to be mindful of for more private notes.
  • I set my account so that all posts and comments have to be approved by me. This makes it so I can read parents comments but not post them if they are personal. 
  • Are you still learning the See-Saw Activities Center? Search the community! There are so many activities that you can copy to your library, edit, and play around with to learn how to write directions, create templates, etc…

Preschool Distance Learning

image of a woman in silhouette holding a talker up to model on webcam

Let me start with this: distance learning is made possible for our families because I run a preschool classroom, not a discrete trial instruction classroom. My focus is creating access to the rich literacy, math, and play-based experiences that are the foundation for a life-long love of learning. Is distance learning perfect? No. I would much rather have my students in my classroom every day, laughing and making memories together. Is it possible? Yes-ish, or at least as best we can, given the circumstances that we’re in.

Yes-ish: Because distance learning is inequitable. The end. Some families have easy access to internet and multiple devices. Some do not. Some families have time or a stay-at-home parent. Some do not. Some are more worried about health, job security, and food on the table. Understandable. Some students are able to sit and work for a little while. Others need direct adult support for every activity. Some know many words on their device, while others are very emergent communicators. A good classroom for our students is a classroom where universal design and accommodations create access. And not all of the elements needed transfer easily to distance learning.

Yes-ish: Because to try is better than not to try. When possible, I’ve done what I can to make distance learning more equitable. I use a platform that I know all of my families are able to access. I assist them to fill out the information needed to get technology support through the county. I use a combination of asynchronous and synchronous learning, a combination of hands-on and sit-down activities, so that each family is able to flex learning around their needs. But it’s not perfect. And any conversation about distance learning has to acknowledge that. It’s doing the best we can with the hand we’ve been given.

Our Distance Learning Plan

AAC System Support – We started a video-based parent training on AAC earlier this year, and finished out the training modules as schools went into closures. Every two weeks, I will send an activity template that encourages modeling and creating communication opportunities at a specific activity or routine. I also post a video explaining or modeling how to do this, pulling from videos I have of their own students when possible.

Sample Schedule – I sent a sample morning schedule home to families who may be struggling to figure out how to structure their day. I was torn about this, because I don’t want to put pressure or stress on families. But several families asked specifically for some guidance around this. The schedule alternates a more structured activity (e.g., reading a book together) with child-directed play. For example, breakfast – movement activity – literacy choice – play – snack – movement activity – math choice – play.

Activity Menus – This is my favorite. It’s my favorite because 1) it requires no technology or computer, 2) there’s built-in flexibility, and 3) this is where I can list ideas for hands-on activities. I am creating an activity menu every two weeks for families. There are five activity ideas each for literacy, math, sensory, and outside play. Yes, that means that half the menu is movement-oriented. It was a deliberate decision. Activity menus allow me to encourage and describe the more hands-on ways of learning that we love in early childhood in a way that isn’t otherwise easy to capture in a “packet”. All activities have been done previously at school. They typically range from 3-10 minutes in duration. They also can be repeated frequently.

Daily Prompt – Every day I post 1-2 prompts to See-Saw for a quick daily check-in with families. Some days, I connect it to the Activity Menu. For example, I shared pictures of home obstacle courses for inspiration on Friday. I’ve also connected it to communication, such as asking students to share what their favorite snack is using the picture communication board or their talkers. Finally, I’ve sent videos of read-alouds, modeling AAC while singing a favorite song on YouTube, and puppets practicing articulation. All quick and easy. The goal here is not to overwhelm families with a jam-packed schedule, but to provide a variety of opportunities. I want families to be able to design their day. Do they only have time for their child to watch video read-aloud while they fold clothes? Great, done. Do they need more things to fill their day, or are they worried about a specific academic skill? Great, we are building a whole library of prompts that you can go back and revisit anytime you want.

Manipulatives – Guys, if you could see the backpacks. When we first closed, I crammed everything I could. Puzzles. Bingo Dotters. Watercolor sets. Paintbrushes. In an ideal world, I would love to make a little “distance learning kit” that I could drop off at homes. Bubbles. Shaving cream. Water beads. Play-Doh. I would fill it with so much sensory. Preschoolers benefit so much from that sort of hands-on, get messy play. Rich sensory experiences provide communication opportunities, language development, science exploration, build math concepts, and strengthen motor skills — and fun. I’m not sure our society gets this, with how much we have to fight for developmentally appropriate practice. It’s something I am trying to stress with my “everything is optional” and “play is central” and “look, so much movement” activity boards. Because it’s true. Play is the work of childhood.

Office Hours – I’ve set virtual up office hours twice a week where I am available for parents to come, ask questions, share experiences, etc. I am pretty available on See-Saw via messaging, but wanted another option. I think sometimes families are afraid to bother me with requesting an appointment or time to talk, so I am hoping this eases their mind. I have them set up once for the morning and once for the evening so that families can choose the time that works best for them.

Virtual Circle Time – We have circle time twice a week right now. It’s filled with music, singing, and dancing — and, of course, lots of modeling on talkers. Even our stories are video stories. I wanted to make it super enticing and enchanting. I really didn’t want my families to have to spend time fighting their child to attend. I don’t even do that in real life… We use sensory regulation, children’s interests, and choice-making to entice children to circle. It’s just that there’s a lot less opportunity for hands-on action in virtual circle time. So we’re focusing on embedding literacy and counting concepts in our favorite songs and stories as we come together each week.

Visual Supports – I’ve offered home picture schedules, first/then boards, and other visual supports to families via digital access or mail.

image of a school bus outline with instructions below it: color your bus, match the letters, and add pictures of yourself or your family

Optional Activities – Finally, for families who want more, I am posting additional — but very optional — activities on See-Saw. I post a teaser each Monday on activities that are available, and students / families can choose to log-in to complete them or not. These tend to be more structured activities, but still short. There’s currently an activity for matching letters and one for creating your own school bus (including adding pictures of yourself or your family). They can be completed one per day, all in one day, randomly throughout the week. Some families have asked for the code to log-in. Some have not. It’s all good.

Throw in a ton of “this is optional” and “do what you need” and “I’m here for you” reminders… Then that basically sums up our current distance learning plan. I hope it sparks some imagination for you if you’ve been struggling with how to reach your littlest friends or your students with higher support needs. May you find the right combination of magic to support your families, whether they wish for a lot or a little.